Five Great Educational Game Websites Reviewed by Electronic Brains on . Many websites offer educational games and activities, making it difficult to decide which ones are best for use in the classroom. Below, I have listed five webs Many websites offer educational games and activities, making it difficult to decide which ones are best for use in the classroom. Below, I have listed five webs Rating:
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Five Great Educational Game Websites

Five Great Educational Game Websites

Many websites offer educational games and activities, making it difficult to decide which ones are best for use in the classroom. Below, I have listed five websites which my students have found to be both educational and fun. I have used games from these websites in the classroom on the Promethean Board. They help build excitement and student engagement when a new unit is introduced, and students enjoy playing the games after a lesson in order to practice newly acquired skills. Games can be assigned for practice at home, making homework fun for students. Follow the links below, and see the variety of games available for yourself!

1. ClassBrain Games

There are a variety of educational games on this site, such as Agricultural Games, Math Games, Puzzle Games, Music Games, and Ecological Games. They offer children the opportunity to explore a variety of subjects in fun and interactive ways. Games are based primarily on U.S. Standards and content, but can also be used by students in other countries such as Canada and the U.K. to review math and language concepts. Class Brain Games are also free to use. Click Here…

2. Sumdog

Sumdog is an inexpensive and fun way for students to practice their computation skills. Using a feature called ‘adaptive math’, it adapts the questions posed to suit each student’s abilities.  With a minimum subscription of 25 accounts, each account is as low as $2.00. Teachers may register for a free 30-day trial, and students often begin by playing the free games available.  Games do not follow the traditional flash-card math drill fashion of many other game sites, and students really have a lot of fun solving math questions with games like Dress Down, Cake Monsters, and Talent Show. Schools in Canada and the US can purchase from Studica Limited. Click Here…

3. Spongelab

Spongelab is a free on-line science community which has great games and interactive activities covering a wide range of science topics. In order to access games, activities and videos, one must register to become a member. Teachers are able to organize lessons and resources through the site, and students are able to participate in the activities online. Students are excited to view their progress and stats through leader boards. Topics include weather, the human body, electricity, genetics, and space. Click Here…

4. Funbrain

This site has a variety of Math and Reading games, as well as Arcade style games for fun. There are also books available for on-line reading. Math games consist of simple arithmetic to complex algebra, depending on skill level. Language games include grammar, root words, and word games based on subject categories. Games are completely free. This site also offers other activities students can explore on their own, with the adult in charge feeling confident that all activities on this site are appropriate. Click Here…

5. Funschool

Funschool.com is full of games and activities, including Math, Language, Science, Geography & History, Sports, and Art & Music games. Games are colourful and fun. Bon Appetit is a word game that helps kids boost their reading comprehension as well as their grammar skills. This game works well in a primary classroom, or in a Special Education classroom for struggling readers in the junior grades. Math games include Action Fraction and Crazy Pattern Machine. There are a great number of games to explore, and too many to list here. This site is well worth visiting. Click Here…

 

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About The Author

Josie Nanfara-Grande is a Special Education Specialist who has been teaching in the TDSB for over thirteen years. She is passionate about increasing student engagement and independent learning skills through the use of digital technology.

Number of Entries : 42
2 comments
james
james

Magic Desktop (http://www.magicdesktop.com) includes many of these websites. It's funny because although the program offers all sorts of applications, my kid always gravitates towards their browser and the included sites. Brainpop and Funschool are some of the resources he visits the most.

elecbrains
elecbrains moderator

James, thank you for your recommendation. I visited the Magic Desktop site, and appreciate the range of programs available which promote creativity, as well as the parent-managed web-browsing this software provides.

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